Pulled pork in a 57 cm (22.5 inch) Weber kettle


From Wikipedia: "Pulled pork is a form of barbecue. It is a method of preparation in which pork, usually shoulder cut (sometimes referred to as Boston butt) or mixed cuts, is cooked using a low-heat, long-cook method. With these extended times at low temperatures, the meat becomes tender enough that its weakened connective tissue allows the meat to be 'pulled', or easily broken into individual pieces." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulled_pork


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There is a lot of instructions on the Internet describing how to make Pulled pork in a Weber kettle. The challenge lies in keeping a steady low temperature by adjusting the vents, sprinkling water on the briquettes should it get too hot and adding briquettes on a regular basis to keep the fire going. Inspired by http://www.weberguru.dk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2332 (in Danish), I started to experiment on how to place the briquettes in order to archive a setup which will burn the whole day and doesn't need nursing. I found that this can be achieved by placing the briquettes in a "fuse"-like formation where you stack the briquettes in layers. The difficult part is to find the balance between maintaining a low temperature that is still hot enough to keep the fuse going. The type of briquettes used, wind speed, wind direction and surrounding temperatures etc. may influence the setup.


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See the pictures below, for the best solution I found so far. I'm using a 57 cm (22.5 inch) Weber One-Touch Gold and Heat beads for briquettes. For smoking chips I usually use Weber FireSpice Hickory Wood Chips. I have tried with several setups e.g. only 2 layers, but it burned out. 3 layers give a little too much heat but will keep the fire going, which is of course what's most important. The surface of the roast will be a little hard, but just cut it into smaller pieces and mix it with the rest of the meat. Next time I'll try to close the top vent a little and see if this can lower the temperature without the fire going out.


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The temperature inside the kettle should be around 100-110C (212-230F). The temperature inside the roast will slowly rise but can stagnate around 75C (167F) and stay there for several hours before suddenly rising again. The roast is done when the core temperature reaches 95C (203F). This will normally take between 9-16 hours.


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When the roast is done, you can use the meat in a variety of ways, but I'll recommend using it for sandwiches to begin with. See the last pictures. As one of my daughters said the first time I made Pulled pork: "Dad, this is the best you have ever done on the Weber..." :-) Top the meat with BBQ sauce and serve it in a toasted bun together with lettuce, cucumber, tomato, red onion and mayo and with e.g. coleslaw and roasted potatoes on the side.



Preparations on the day before:



In the morning:



Enjoy... :-)